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21 - 27 Apr , 2012
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Housefull 2This Week MAG Recommends

Housefull 2
In a scene towards the latter half of the film, Riteish Deshmukh uses a flowchart to explain who's who, who's posing as who and who's being assumed as who in film. If this confuses you, that's precisely what director Sajid Khan intends to do. Housefull 2 is certainly less silly and slapstick than its predecessor. Akshay Kumar does a hilarious spin-off on yesteryear villain Ranjeet who holds the reprehensible record of playing a rapist in a maximum number of films. And Ranjeet actually brings the house down with his cameo in the climax where he successfully self-spoofs himself. Since Akshay and John are playing the male leads, it's mandatory that they first fight each other, then, together, fight the goons extensively and finally save a father figure from the falling chandelier. The first half is exhausted with unnecessary build-up through love stories and fathers-of-bride (Randhir Kapoor, Rishi Kapoor) who want billionaire son-in-laws for their daughters. The original essence of the franchise – of filling a house with multiple characters which results into a comedy of errors – initiates only in the second half, as a dozen characters land up in one palatial mansion. Each one mistakes the other for someone else and this comedy of mistaken identities isn't much different from the prequel or its likes. Housefull 2 is neither fully gratifying nor a house-of-horror like its prequel.

LockoutLockout
Lockout is a cinematic stunt, a motorcycle ride across a tightrope that teeters the line between bombastic fun and nonsensical lunacy. Guy Pearce stars as the one-liner-slinging Snow, an alleged murderer sentenced to life in the orbital penitentiary MS One. Snow fails to convince Langral (Peter Stromare), head of the Secret Service, that his recent car chasing escapades were anything more than a crazy man on the crazy run, when in fact, we know it's all in an effort to protect and hand off a briefcase. Meanwhile, the President's daughter, Emilie (Maggie Grace), heads to MS One to get the scoop on the prison's nefarious psychological experiments, only to find herself in the middle of an all-out inmate revolt. With a hostage situation on the Secret Service's hands, there's only one person suitable for the infiltration hostage mission: the guy they just convicted as a murderer. Snow is the best man for the job because Pearce's gravitas outdoes every tense dramatic moment, every flashy action scene, and every computer graphics spectacle in Lockout.

The Cabin In The WoodsThe Cabin In The Woods
Five college kids scoot off to a remote woodland cabin for a weekend break, where, after the discovery of a rum diary in the creepy basement and the unwise uttering of some ominous Latin scrawling, things swiftly turn horrific. The film actually begins in a control room for what looks like a corporate laboratory of some sort. The two head scientists are played by Bradley Whitford and Richard Jenkins, who wear ties and shirtsleeves and who seem to command a staff of busy underlings. At some point, the connection between the lab and the cabin is revealed but that's all one must say – The Cabin In The Woods never goes where you expect it to. And it has a hell of a lot of fun reaching its final, unpredictable destination.
It's a delightfully constructed puzzle, one that pays attention to its source material – the modern teen-horror-movie formula, while poking fun at it simultaneously. And it manages to not only meet the expectations of modern horror but to blow them out of the water. Don't watch The Cabin In The Woods to make sense, watch it for thrill.

Damsels In DistressDamsels In Distress
When Lily transfers to scenic Seven Oaks, three strange but charismatic young women approach her like a girl gang in matching sweater sets. Although Lily doesn't need help with her wardrobe or men, Violet, Heather, and Rose recruit her to live with them, hang out with them, and join them in their efforts to thwart the school's 'atmosphere of male barbarism'. With Violet as a slightly awkward ringleader, the trio has very strict ideas of what's proper and what's not, what kind of behaviours lead to depression and general un-cleanliness and what will most enhance each person's happiness. They set out to do this by avoiding handsome men and offering depressed students tap dancing classes and fresh-smelling soap. However, even though Violet's biggest dream is to kick off 'an international dance craze', something she assumes will benefit many people on a wider scale than their college-level suicide interventions, they all seem sort of depressed. Is it anthropological curiosity that motivates Lily, the loneliness of a new school, or, as with the audience, the sort of weird charm shot through sadness that Violet possesses? Damsels In Distress is somewhat perplexing.

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